FROM COUNTERCULTURE TO CYBERCULTURE PDF

Published by on December 27, 2019
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From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network, and the Rise of Digital Utopianism. Available at In the early s, . From Counterculture to Cyberculture has ratings and 44 reviews. Warwick said: This is a sad story in many ways: I wonder if the author realises quite. Journal of e-Media Studies Volume I, Issue 1, Spring Dartmouth College Fred Turner, From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth.

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Shedding new light on how our networked culture came to be, this fascinating book reminds us that the distance between the Grateful Dead and Google, between Ken Kesey and the computer itself, is not as great as we might think. Books by Fred Turner. I actually almost finished it, almost made it This book was a massive disappointment.

I initially picked this book since it discusses many events that were part of my life as well — from the Summer of Love in SF to working for the government on classified computer projects. Aug 29, John Ohno rated it really liked it Shelves: This is a sad story in many ways: Hardcover1st editionpages. It’s one of those books that really helps clarify where we are and how we got here.

The optimistic view as recounted in the book of the thinking in the s of what the Internet could become has come face-to-face with the harsh realities of what the Internet has become. Fascinating central argument connecting 60s counterculture to the Internet, well researched, well written, insightful, etc. Repetitive at times, the seams of stitched together academic papers show through from chapter to chapter.

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Dec 07, Otis Chandler marked it as to-read. Taking the Whole Earth Digital 5.

The result of all this was that, yes, the digital revolution was always dominated by ideas of self-sufficiency and non-regulation; but it was also always dominated by the welcoming of corporate control and by a generally white male technocratic sensibility, with all the positive and negative connotations those cybercculture imply.

In the cyberculfure s, computers haunted the American popular imagination. While not going so far as to completely answer these questions, Turner provides a detailed and unbiased cultural history that informs further research into these questions.

A well-woven history of the ’60s counterculture, as personified in Stewart Brand, and its evolution into the cyberculture that came to prominence counterfulture the s with the Internet boom and, in some small part, informs the digital culture of today. Does Science Need a Global Language?

That moment in the story when Newt Gingrich hoves into view, Jabba-like, and you realize the game was rigged from the start. Apr 06, Nicholas Su rated it it was amazing. Ultimately, the failure of Brand’s movement was in its lack of a political agenda. Most definitely not recommended. A bit dull, but well worth reading. Brand succeeded in networking a host of elites, who have largely influenced the way we talk about the Internet but, for the most part, haven’t had much impact on how we use it, nor how it’s developed over the past decade.

From Counterculture to Cyberculture

I found the prose to be a bit windy, but the overall message is sound and there is nothing else out there that really addresses these issues in a serious way. I’m giving the book two stars instead of one because the topic is good, but the book is not. Contained some great anecdotes but overall was very repetitive. Between andvia such familiar venues as the National Book Award—winning Whole Earth Catalog, the computer conferencing system known as WELL, and ultimately, the launch of the wildly successful Wired magazine, Brand and his colleagues brokered a long-running encounter between San Francisco flower power and the emerging technological hub of Silicon Valley.

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How did the culture of computing become so closely allied with a self-contradictory mix of anti-authoritarian politics and communitarian ethos, after being identified with the military and large corporations in the s and s?

From Counterculture to Cyberculture

A skillful recounting of some of the most important philosophical and personal history of the Internet. They all saw the Internet as a transformative technology that would finally allow people to talk about issues, share information, and govern themselves without governmental interference.

Writing is just realllly dry. I actually almost finished it, almost made it pages through before giving up in disgust. It answered many personal questions I had. To see what your friends thought of this book, cybercultuge sign up.

Between andvia such familiar venues as the National Book Award—winning Whole Earth Catalogthe computer conferencing system known as WELL, and, ultimately, the launch of the wildly successful Wired magazine, Brand and his colleagues brokered a long-running collaboration between San Francisco flower power and the emerging technological hub of Silicon Valley.

It basically argues that the counterculture ethos of the the ‘s had a profound affect on the libertarian formation of what has come to be called cyberspace.